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1  Source (S2645867780)
 
2  Source (S2645870599)
 
3  Source (S2645870696)
 
4  Source (S2645883387)
 
5  Source (S2645885806)
 
6  Source (S2645887384)
 
7  Source (S2645891396)
 
8  Source (S2645892271)
 
9  Source (S2645910474)
 
10  Source (S2645914306)
 
11  Source (S2645931687)
 
12  Source (S2645933084)
 
13  Source (S2649189496)
 
14  Source (S2649196682)
 
15  Source (S2655354466)
 
16 "A German Catholic who lived in French province of Lorraine when it was under German rule. He emigrated to Canada, then was exiled to Maryland along with Acadian friends. In 1769, the schooner Britannia left Maryland with 56 Germans, 32 Acadians and 12 British, headed for Louisiana. As the schooner reached the Louisiana Coast, there was a dense fog. An east wind blew the ship off course and onto the Texas coast. After a six-month wait in Texas, the newcomers traveled overland to Natchitoches. Jacob went to St. John Parish, later settled in Opelousas." -Karen Theriot Reader Miller, Jacob (I3742)
 
17 "Anna Sanders 15 years old was adopted by George Ament and his wife Leah in 1860. This info is stated in the family Bible." (cadamsesq on Ancestry.com) On the 1850 census in Lafourche Parish, Anna and her half-sister Audelia are living with "Widow Thomkins," who must be Leah Tompkins, the wife of George Ament. Apparently Ament was her second husband, married later in life. On the 1860 census in Assumption Parish, we find George Ament (age 68) and Lea Ament (age 63). Lewis Sanders, Anna's half-brother, is living with them. Did the Aments adopt Anna later that year? Sanders, Lucy Anna (P2571163245)
 
18 "Benjamin Fifield, aged about 60 years, was Barborously killed, in his pasture not far from his house, by the Indians, on the 1st day of August, 1706, and a young lad kild or taken." (Hampton Town Record) Fifield, Benjamin (I7076)
 
19 "Benjamin, second son and child of John and Hester Cram, married November 28, 1662, Argentine Cromwell, possibly widow of Thomas Cromwell, one of the grantees, about twenty-one years old at the time of the grant, who appears to have been in Hampton a short time with the first settlers, and is said to have died in Boston in 1649. Their children were: Sarah, John, Benjamin, Mary, Joseph, Hannah, Esther, Jonathan and Elizabeth." (from "Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire," edited by Ezra Stearns, 1908)  Cram, Benjamin (P2598701794)
 
20 "Benjamin, second son and child of John and Hester Cram, married November 28, 1662, Argentine Cromwell, possibly widow of Thomas Cromwell, one of the grantees, about twenty-one years old at the time of the grant, who appears to have been in Hampton a short time with the first settlers, and is said to have died in Boston in 1649. Their children were: Sarah, John, Benjamin, Mary, Joseph, Hannah, Esther, Jonathan and Elizabeth." (from "Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire," edited by Ezra Stearns, 1908)  Cromwell, Argentine (P2598703141)
 
21 "He died in his sleep at the age of 81 in April of 1978. He worked various jobs (sometimes 2 or 3 jobs at once to support his family). He smoked a pipe (cherry tobacco) to relax. If he didn't want to pay attention to anything, he'd turn his hearing aid off. He was a very quiet gentle man. He and his brothers formed the Dickson String Band, which later became the Garden State String band and now its Durning of Gloucester City. He played the banjo and mandolin. String Bands are a big deal in the Philadelphia area. They're called 'The Mummers'. They have a big parade in Philly every New Year's Day and make special appearances throughout the year." (thanks, Helen!) Dickson, Albert Hambright (I5258)
 
22 "He distinguished himself in the Civil War, on the side of the King.1 He was invested as a Knight after 1643.1 He was created 1st Baronet Bathurst, of Lechlade, co. Gloucester and of Farrington, co. Oxford [England] on 15 December 1643." (thepeerage.com) Bathurst, Sir Edward (I5502)
 
23 "He was to be named Henry Pierrekin, meaning 'first son of Pierre.'" -James Fulton Perkins Perkins, Henry (I3570)
 
24 "Jeremiah French: Admitted pensioner, age 16, at Caius College, Apr. 28 1641. Son of Thomas, gent. of Knettishall, Suffolk. Born at Saxmundham. School, Benhall. Matriculated 1641; Scholar, 1643-5; B.A. 1644-5; M.A. 1648. Minister of Newport, Isle of Wight. Imprisoned in Carisbrook Castle for his comments upon the treatment of Charles I, and tried for his life. Afterwards minister at Yeovil; and South Perrott, Dorset, 1652-62. After his ejection he preached in the neighborhood of Bradford Abbas, Dorset. Died about May 10, 1685." (Cambridge University Alumni Record) French, Jeremiah (I1053)
 
25 "John Cram was of Exeter, New Hampshire, and one of the signers of the Combination, soon after the settlement of that town. Not long after he removed to Hampton and settled on the south side of Taylor's river (now Hampton Falls), near the site of the Weare monument. He died March 5, 1682. In the record of his death he is styled "good old John Cram, one just in his generation." In his will two sons, Benjamin and Thomas, are mentioned, and two daughters, Mary and Lydia. His wife's name was Hester. She died May 16, 1677. Their children were: Joseph, Benjamin, Thomas, Mary and Lydia." (from "Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire," edited by Ezra Stearns, 1908) Cram, John (P2598708629)
 
26 "L'heritage de St. Martin: St. Martin Parish Genealogy" by Betty T. Pourciaux (April 16, 1985)

Philosie Pourciau was born in January 1807 and baptized on August 8, 1807 in Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana. He was married there to Euranie Saizan. After the death of Euranie, he married again, to Phelonaise Major, daughter of Bienvenu Major and Eudemonde LeBedel on May 5, 1831 in Pointe Coupee Parish. Philosie was the son of Jean Baptiste Pourciau and Euphrosine Chenevert, and the grandson of Jean Baptiste Pourciaux and Marguerite Marioneau, all of Pointe Coupee Parish. Philosie and Phelonaise came to St. Martin Parish around 1852. Phelonaise died in 1855 and Philosie died on January 12, 1858, both of St. Martin Parish." 
Pourciau, Philosie (P2571257303)
 
27 "L'heritage de St. Martin: St. Martin Parish Genealogy" by Betty T. Pourciaux (April 16, 1985)

[...]

Arcade Pourciau, born in 1834, in Pointe Coupee, married in Breaux Bridge on May 10, 1859 to Felicia Hebert, daughter of Lasty Hebert and Marie Adeline Begnaud. Arcade was a cotton farmer in the Breaux Bridge area. He died on November 25, 1862 and Felicia died in 1865, both in Breaux Bridge." 
Pourciau, Arcade (P2571130105)
 
28 "L'heritage de St. Martin: St. Martin Parish Genealogy" by Betty T. Pourciaux (April 16, 1985)

[...]

Olivier Pourciau, born on April 11, 1860. Being orphaned at 5 years old, he was sent to Pointe Coupee Parish to be reared by relatives. In 1879, he returned to Breaux Bridge to marry on January 21, to Azalie Latiolais, daughter of Eugene Latiolais and Emerenthe Guidry. Olivier and Azalie were the parents of eleven children. Olivier died on August 7, 1927 and Azelie died in 1947, both in Breaux Bridge." 
Pourciaux, Olivier (P2571277152)
 
29 "Lewis Moore (son of Lewis Moore and Marguerite Caldwell) was a Major in the Revolutionary War. He was married to Rebecca Henshaw, also of Frederick County WV. While in Kentucky, he owned and operated a tavern at Limestone in Mason County. He later migrated to Natchez MS and finally settled in St Mary Parish, LA where he served as a District Judge until his death in 1831." (migrations.org) Moore, Lewis (I3658)
 
30 "Lydia Veau Baldwin, on Monday morning, April 5, 1976 at 12:15 o'clock, wife of the late Frank D. Baldwin, mother of Alvin R. and Francis D. Baldwin, daughter of the late Felix Veau and Louise Carriere, age 92 years. Relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services from McMahon, Coburn, Briede Funeral Home, 600 Moss St. at N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy. and Bayou St. John on Tuesday afternoon, April 6, 1976 at 1:00 followed by Requiem Mass at the funeral home. Interment Lake Lawn Mausoleum. Friends may call on Monday after 7 p.m." (Times-Picayune; 6 Apr 1976) Veau, Lydia (I4919)
 
31 "Matrimonial."

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Fletcher "At home" Wednesdays in December.

Train 12 today brought from Chicago Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Fletcher, and they were met at the depot by scores of friends who welcomed Mr. Fletcher home, and Mrs. Fletcher to her new home. The wedding ceremony of these young people took place at the residence of Mr. Charles Cloyes, the bride's father, in Chicago, yesterday, and was performed by Prof. David Swing. Only the bride's relatives and Mr. A.B. Fletcher and Mr. E.F. Dickinson were present, and the couple started immediately for Jamestown. Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher will reside with Mrs. A. Fletcher, on West Third Street, and reception cards are issued for Wednesdays in December.

We take considerable pride in making the above announcement; having a sort of fellow feeling for any man who has struggled through a printing office until he reaches an easy chair. Mr. Fletcher is the youngest son of the late Adolphus Fletcher, and was literally born in a printing office, and at present is associated with Mr. A.B. Fletcher, his brother, in the publication of the Democrat, the legacy of their father. His bride visited friends in Jamestown last summer, and is quite well known to our people, and while we welcome her to our society, we have our misgivings about extending the fraternal hand; the printer's life showing off better in poetry than in prose. But laying aside all cares, we join in the general congratulation--may your married life be long in years and filled with joys and blessings.

(thanks to Kim Clements for sending me the two newspaper articles on this marriage) 
Family F1078
 
32 "My nickname 'Nookie,' started out to be 'Snookums,' Aunt Famie [Euphemie Marceaux] called me this after a comic character with blond curls & blue eyes - the name evolved to 'Nookie.'" (Olive Sonnier Pitre's family history book) Sonnier, Olive Jane (P2570521734)
 
33 "My only child, a boy, died at nineteen years of age." (Amadeo Pourciau) Pourciau, Leonard (I8445)
 
34 "On Friday evening, Dec. 25, 1964, at 5:40 o'clock, Frank D. Baldwin; beloved husband of Lydia Veau; father of Mrs. Steve Johnson of Charleston, Mo.; Francis D. and Alvin R. Baldwin; brother of Joseph Baldwin; also survived by seven grandchildren and several great-grandchildren; age 80 years; a native of Anna, Ill., and a resident of this city. Relatives and friends of the family, also former members of Cardinal Athletic Club and employees of American Can Co., are invited to attend the funeral. Services from McMahon-Coburn-Briede, 600 Moss St. (where Bayou St. John starts), on Monday morning, Dec. 28, 1964, at 11 o'clock, followed by Requiem Mass at Our Lady of the Rosary Church. Interment in St. Louis No. 2 Cemetery." (Times-Picayune; 28 Dec 1964) Baldwin, Frank Dallas (I4918)
 
35 "Robert R. Rood settled quite early at Mooers Junction, and was an active, influential man. He erected a saw-mill, dealt largely in lumber, and was a large land-owner. He raised a large family. Horace, David, Josiah, and Robert Rood, sons, are living in town."

"The first post-office at Mooers village was established Dec. 6, 1822, and Robert R. Rood was appointed the first postmaster. He held the office a great many years."

(Excerpts from A History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York, 1880) 
Rood, Robert Randolph (I1185)
 
36 "The Story of Joshua and Daniel": http://www.rawbw.com/~hinshaw/england.htm#Joshua Henshaw, Joshua (I3666)
 
37 "They were shipped out of MD and ship wrecked off the Texas coast. After several months they were released from their Spanish captors and settled in LA. This German family settled in LA and gradually blended into the Cajun culture." (http://www.lulu.com/browse/book_view.php?fCID=605520&fBuyItem=11 Miller, Jacob (I3742)
 
38 "Thomas Welles is the only man in Connecticut's history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. He was born ca. 1590 in Stourton, Whichford, Warwickshire, England, the son of Robert and Alice Welles.

Thomas arrived in Boston prior to 9 June 1636, when his deed was witnessed, but was probably not the Thomas Welles who was a passenger on the Susan and Ellen in 1635 as reported in some sources (that Thomas was probably the Thomas Welles who became a resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts). Thomas is said to have been a secretary to Lord Saye and Sele. While no primary evidence for this has been found, the books in his estate suggest that he had a good education and he did have close associations with Saye and Sele, although he had little to do with the development of the Saybrook Colony. He perhaps lived at Newtown (now Cambridge), MA for a while, and was probably one of the group of about 100 to come to Hartford with Thomas Hooker in 1636.

Thomas Welles served a total of nineteen years in various Colony of Connecticut positions. He was a member of the first Court of Magistrates, elected March 28, 1637, and was reelected as a member of the Court of Magistrates from 1638 until 1654. During his terms as magistrate in 1648, 1651, and 1654 he sat on the panel hearing the witchcraft trials of Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert. In 1639 he was elected as the first treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut, and from 1640-1649 served as the colony's secretary. In this capacity he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official colony records. On May 18, 1654 he was elected as Deputy Governor and became the acting moderator of the General Court, as the elected governor, Edward Hopkins, was in England. He was elected governor in 1655 and 1658 and served again as deputy governor for 1656, 1657, and 1659. He was a commissioner to the New England Confederation in 1649 and in 1654. For a more extensive summary of Thomas Welles' service to the Connecticut Colony, see Appendix B of Siemiatoski's genealogy, below.

Thomas Welles married Alice Tomes soon after July 5, 1615 in Long Marston, Gloucestershire, and the couple had eight children. After her death, he married again about 1646 in Wethersfield. His second wife was Elizabeth (nee Deming) Foote, sister of John Deming and widow of Nathaniel Foote. Elizabeth had seven children by her previous marriage; there were no children from the second marriage.

Thomas Welles lived in Hartford from 1636 until the time of his second marriage. His house was on the same street as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour, a street that was known as Governor Street until more recent times, when the name was changed to Popieluszko Court. He died on January 14, 1660 at Wethersfield and was probably buried there. Some sources indicate that his remains were later transferred to the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford. In either case, his grave is presently unmarked. His name appears on the Founders Monument in Hartford's Ancient Burying Ground."

(from Connecticut State Library, http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm) 
Welles, Governor Thomas (I1043)
 
39 "Wedding Bells"

The Fletcher-Cloyes Wedding in Chicago Yesterday

Another of Jamestown's most popular bachelors has emigrated to the state of matrimony. Mr. Charles F. Fletcher, publisher of the Chautauqua Democrat, of this place, was quietly married to Miss Emma Cloyes, of Chicago, at three o'clock yesterday afternoon. The marriage took place at the home of the bride's father Mr. Charles Cloyes, a prominent commission merchant of Chicago, and was witnessed by only a few of the relatives of the contracting parties. Mr. Fletcher has a host of friends in this community and his wife, who is a lady of rare amiability, will make a valuable addition to the society of our town. The happy couple started for Jamestown last evening and arrived here on train 12 today. 
Family F1078
 
40 "When Aunt Ora visited Mama - May, 1989 she recounted to Yvonne & I how she & her husband Harry Bayliss (Brother Bayliss, he was called) drove Mama in their Studebaker to marry Daddy in Lafayette. She told how she tried to persuade her father that Mama was too young to marry (14 years old) but nevertheless they married. The wedding reception was at Papit & Mamit's place in Anse La Butte. Aunt Ora said it was quite an event. She also said when they got to church, a bunch of Mama's school friends were there to attend the wedding at St. Genieve's Catholic Church, Lafayette, La. While cleaning after her death in 1989, I found the top of her wedding cake with cake still on it & 2 glasses with initial S on them. I fixed it in a dome & Yvonne has it as well as her wedding dress - Clarissa married in it." (Olive Sonnier Pitre's family history book) Family F4
 
41 #165. PIERRE DARTEST, DEC. 24 SEPT. 1828

Decedent recently died intestate; his widow is Julia Ann Legnon; 5 children of this marriage are his legal heirs: 1. Lovesgen [?], 2. Euphemie, 3. Nevell, 4. Ernestine, 5. Adrian Dartest, all minors. Real estate is included in this estate. Frederic Pellerin and Alexander Sigur appointed appraisers. Julia Ann, the widow, is natural tutrix of the minors; Joseph Legnon is undertutor of the 5 minors and the unborn infant with which the widow is now pregnant.

2 Feb. 1829. Fam. meeting: Louis Legnon and Eugene Legnon, uncles of minors; Eugenie Dartest, aunt of minors; Laurent Segur and John Armelin fils [?], friends of said minors.

19 Aug. 1833. Fam. meeting: Joseph Legnon, maternal uncle and undertutor; Louis and Eugene Legnon, maternal uncles; Nicolas Louis Pellerin [the minors' brother-in-law]; Jean Armelin [?]; and Laurent Sigur, friends. Julia Ann Legnon remarried to John Hawkins of St. Mary Parish. Lovesgen [?] is to be emancipated. Louis Legnon is tutor to Neville. Nicolas Louis Pellerin is tutor to Ernestine. Eugene Legnon, tutor to Adrian. Joseph Legnon remains undertutor. Julia Ann removed as tutrix because John Hawkins has not sufficient property to secure the minors' estate. Nicolas Louis Pellerin was married to Euphemie Dartest 19 Jan. 1832.

17 Sept. 1836. Neville, Celestine, Ernestine, and Pierre Adrien are still minors. [Note: the unborn child at the time of decedent's death must have miscarried or died; it is not mentioned anymore in the succession after the initial statement as to its impending birth.]

(St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, Heirship Series Vol. I: Annotated Abstracts of the Successions, 1811-1834) 
Legnon, Julienne (I3762)
 
42 #165. PIERRE DARTEST, DEC. 24 SEPT. 1828

Decedent recently died intestate; his widow is Julia Ann Legnon; 5 children of this marriage are his legal heirs: 1. Lovesgen [?], 2. Euphemie, 3. Nevell, 4. Ernestine, 5. Adrian Dartest, all minors. Real estate is included in this estate. Frederic Pellerin and Alexander Sigur appointed appraisers. Julia Ann, the widow, is natural tutrix of the minors; Joseph Legnon is undertutor of the 5 minors and the unborn infant with which the widow is now pregnant.

2 Feb. 1829. Fam. meeting: Louis Legnon and Eugene Legnon, uncles of minors; Eugenie Dartest, aunt of minors; Laurent Segur and John Armelin fils [?], friends of said minors.

19 Aug. 1833. Fam. meeting: Joseph Legnon, maternal uncle and undertutor; Louis and Eugene Legnon, maternal uncles; Nicolas Louis Pellerin [the minors' brother-in-law]; Jean Armelin [?]; and Laurent Sigur, friends. Julia Ann Legnon remarried to John Hawkins of St. Mary Parish. Lovesgen [?] is to be emancipated. Louis Legnon is tutor to Neville. Nicolas Louis Pellerin is tutor to Ernestine. Eugene Legnon, tutor to Adrian. Joseph Legnon remains undertutor. Julia Ann removed as tutrix because John Hawkins has not sufficient property to secure the minors' estate. Nicolas Louis Pellerin was married to Euphemie Dartest 19 Jan. 1832.

17 Sept. 1836. Neville, Celestine, Ernestine, and Pierre Adrien are still minors. [Note: the unborn child at the time of decedent's death must have miscarried or died; it is not mentioned anymore in the succession after the initial statement as to its impending birth.]

(St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, Heirship Series Vol. I: Annotated Abstracts of the Successions, 1811-1834) 
Dartes, Pierre (I85257)
 
43 (Epitaph; thanks to Kim Clements)

"Farewell, my spouse and children dear,
I've left this world of pain,
May virtue be your practice here
Till we do meet again." 
Goldthwaite, Stephen (I741)
 
44 (Epitaph; thanks to Kim Clements)

"Sacred to the memory of Patience Goldthwaite, widow of Stephen Goldthwaite, died Feb 9, 1826 in the 90th year of her age - 'Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord for they rest from their labors and their works do follow them.'" 
Very, Patience (I742)
 
45 (from "Cloyes House Moved to Southboro" by Marjorie E. Hock; thanks to Kim Clements)

"He lived on the S.B. Bird Place, he was a selectman for four years, and a member of the school committee. He served in Capt. Simon Edgell's Company of Minute men, marched to Concord on April 19, 1775 and took part in the pursuit of the British. Can't you just imagine the tales Jonas used to hear about this as a young boy? When I learned the poem of Paul Revere's ride, as a young child, I wasn't aware of what James had done, and that he was a "Minute Man." 
Clayes, James (I761)
 
46 (from "Genealogical Record of Henry Leland"; thanks to Kim Clements)

"James Leland was a farmer. When James Leland left Sherburne, in 1723, for the county of Worcester, the place where he settled was a new and uncultivated country. He acquired a large tract of land upon the Blackstone river, in the Southwest corner of the township of Hassanamisco, which was afterwards, in 1735, incorporated as a town, by the name of Grafton, and in the adjoining part of the town of Sutton." 
Leland, James (I771)
 
47 (from "Genealogical Record of some of the Noyes Descendants"; thanks to Kim Clements)

"Thomas Noyes lived in Acton, where he was a selectman and assessor, 1787-8-9, and 1792. Delegate to the convention at Concord to regulate the prices of the necessities of life, 1779; also at same place, Aug. 23, 1786, to redress grievances against the State; also to instruct delegates to the State Convention, 1787; delegate to Provincial Congress at Concord, 23 May 1786; Representative, 1787-9; ensign of company in west part of town. He is credited with revolutionary service in Capt. Simeon Hunt's company of Col. Eleaser Brooks' Regiment." 
Noyes, Thomas (I752)
 
48 (from "Goldthwaite Genealogy"; thanks to Kim Clements)

"Ezekiel was the first of several Goldthwaites of that name, called after his grandfather, Ezekiel Cheever of Boston, Master of the Latin School. Soon after his marriage he received by deed from his father, Jan. 21, 1697, a dwelling house and land, the house being one built by his grandfather, Thomas Goldthwaite, before 1661. In 1709 and 1711 he received other land from his father, and a considerable number of later land transactions in which he was concerned are found in the records. [...]

"Ezekiel Goldthwaite appears in the parish records as collector, assessor, on committee for altering the meeting-house, and as one of the prudential committee. An original order, dated Sept. 3, 1708, appointing Ezekiel Goldthwaite collector of taxes in the town of Salem, is in possession of his descendants. He was by trade a mason." 
Goldthwait, Ezekiel (I777)
 
49 (from "Goldthwaite Genealogy"; thanks to Kim Clements)

"Samuel Goldthwaite was, like his father, a cooper, and had his home at the west end of the Goldthwaite farm. [...]

"Samuel lived through the exciting time of Salem Witchcraft (beginning 1692), having then a family of young children. The name Goldthwaite is not found in connection with any of the trials of that period, though his near neighbors must, some of them, have been involved. If the tradition which has come down regarding the Goldthwaite of that day, and which can relate only to him, is true, it is an indication of his decided character, as well as of his good sense. The story, as preserved among his descendants in Salem, relates that one of his children, it is inferred a daughter, infected by the prevailing epidemic, began to "cry out" against some persons as bewitching her, when her father took her to the barn, administered wholesome punishment, and thus ended all further trouble of that kind in his family." 
Goldthwait, Samuel (I784)
 
50 (from "Historical Handbook of the Van Voorhees Family in the Netherlands and America", 1935; thanks to Steve Wurster's website)

"We come now to consider briefly the earliest Dutch churches on Long Island. Before 1654 the people had to come over to New Amsterdam for regular preaching and communion. In 1654 came Dominie Johannes Theodorus Polhemus from Brazil, now about 56 years old, to serve the churches then formed to Midwout and Amersfoort, continuing here till his death on June 8, (9) 1676; and serving also at Breuckelen (Brooklyn) 1656 to 1660 and again from 1664 till his death at the age of about 78 years.

"Polhemus was, indeed, Johann Theodore Polheim, probably of German-Swiss origin, whose earlier pastorates seem to have been in the Palatinate; then at Meppel in the provence of Overyssel, Netherlands; again in the Palatinate, until 1635; and from 1637 to 1654, in successive ministries at Olinda and at Itamarcas, both in Brazil. We have already shown that from Brazil he came to Amersfoort as the first Dominie of this historic parish. Polhemus was the first regularly stationed minister of the Dutch on Long Island. He came to New Netherland at the evacuation of Brazil by the Dutch, upon the surrender of that country to Portuguese domination. It is said that Polhemus preached in French and Portuguese while in Brazil, and undoubtedly, in Dutch. He, of course, knew Latin and German, and probably other languages. When he came here, his wife did not accompany him. She went to Holland to seek collection of the arrears owing to him by the Dutch West India Company. His transfer to Long Island was ratified by the classis in 1656, and arrangements were made to aid Mevrouw Polhemus to come to Long Island to join her husband. Classis characterized her thus: 'She is a very worthy matron, has great desire to be with her husband, and has struggled along here in poverty and great straits, always conducting herself modestly and piously.'"

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/8048/index.htm 
Polhemus, Johannes Theodorus (I901)
 

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  Note: While I do try to verify my information as much as I possibly can, please don't assume that everything on this site is 100% correct. I find info through Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, and tons of the personal genealogy sites online. You'll see that some people on my site are listed with lots of sources (especially the Acadians), and some have none. When I find info on other sites, I go ahead and add it as a hint or pointer, and I gradually go through and try to verify the info I've found. If you use info on my site that I haven't listed any sources for, you should not assume it's accurate. And obviously, the further back you go, the more cautious you should be.

  If you spot an error or have additions/suggestions, please let me know, either by email (edeainfj {at} gmail.com) or using the "suggest" link on individual pages. I hope you find this site helpful, and if you're a distant cousin, let me know!

  -Edea (DeeDee) Baldwin

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